How long after getting married can you get a green card?

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What is the easiest European country to get permanent residency?

Plan your own Brexit: The 10 easiest countries for securing EU…

What is the easiest EU country to get citizenship?

Portugal

Which country is immigration friendly?

List of Immigration Friendly Countries

Which country gives permanent residency easily?

Panama is one of the easiest countries to get Permanent residency and has many routes to acquiring this. Purchasing property worth EUR 250,000 makes an individual eligible for Greek Permanent residency.

Which country has the highest deportation?

Mexico

Which is the easiest country to get citizenship?

Easy countries for Citizenship by Birth Place

Who is eligible for green card fee waiver?

You may qualify for a fee waiver if your household income is at or below 150 percent of the Federal Poverty Guidelines at the time you file. Check the current poverty levels for this year at Form I-912P, HHS Poverty Guidelines for Fee Waiver Requests.

How do you get a green card fee waiver?

To request a fee waiver when applying for green card renewals, you’re required to file an additional form. This is Form I-912, Request for Fee Waiver. This is used to claim a fee waiver for every eligible application offered by the USCIS, like I-129, I-191, I-290B, I-485, and I-539.

Can I stay in US after marriage?

Once you marry, your spouse can apply for permanent residence and remain in the United States while we process the application. If you choose this method, file a Form I-129F, Petition for Alien Fiancé(e). Filing instructions and forms are available on our Web site at www. uscis.

Do I need to change my green card after marriage?

In order to comply with the requirements of the USCIS, you need to update your green card as soon as your name is legally changed. There is additional paperwork needed to do this.

How long after getting married can you get a green card?

The current total wait time for a marriage-based green card ranges between 9 to 36 months, depending on whether you are married to a U.S. citizen or green card holder and where you currently live (not including possible delays).

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